Toronto Star Archives

Document
Advanced Saved Help
 Buy Complete Document:   AbstractAbstract Full Text Full Text
Comics gain face in schools; READING TOOL Toronto teacher invites his pupils to dive into comics, writes Christopher Hutsul
[ONT Edition]
Toronto Star - Toronto, Ont.
Author: Hutsul, Christopher
Date: Dec 18, 2005
Start Page: C.03
Section: Entertainment
Abstract (Document Summary)

Thirty years later, [Stephen Marks] is making the rules. Not only does he allow comics in class at Dovercourt Public School, he celebrates them. In September, he and librarian Wendy Sniderman, with help from principal Linda Conetta and parent volunteers, launched a comic book club. The weekly program is designed both to teach kids about comics and to convert reluctant readers. The club has been a hit and, so far, no brain rotting has been reported.

The Dovercourt club is based loosely on a program out of Columbia University in New York called the Comic Book Project. It encourages inner city schoolchildren to create comics that reflect their communities. The kids work in small groups that draw on individual strengths; one child will write the comic, another will draw it, another will do the colouring and so on. When the comics are completed, they're assembled and exhibited in other communities. Right now, there are 30,000 kids involved.

Rick Madonik toronto star Dovercourt pupils (from left) Kyle Terrell, 10, John Tan, 10, and Jausmy Longange, 9, work on their comic at the weekly club session. At right, a student sampling from Columbia's Comic Book Project. Rick Madonik toronto star Dovercourt pupils (from left) Kyle Terrell, 10, John Tan, 10, and Jausmy Longange, 9, work on their comic at the weekly club session. At right, a student sampling from Columbia's Comic Book Project.

 Buy Complete Document:   AbstractAbstract Full Text Full Text