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Memory of Holocaust central to new world order Unchallenged, racism has the capacity to undercut civilization's basic values and to destroy democracy
[FIN Edition]
Toronto Star - Toronto, Ont.
Author: Kagedan, Ian J
Date: Nov 26, 1991
Start Page: A.17
Section: OPINION
Abstract (Document Summary)

Resistance to a productive contemplation of the Holocaust is apparent elsewhere in Europe. War-time Poland was a virtual death factory for millions of Jews. Only eyes blinded by anti-Semitism could have failed to notice the fact of so many "missing" neighbors. Yet can one speak of a coming to terms with the Holocaust?

So, it is no surprise that Holocaust revisionist David Irving continues to find audiences in Canada, nor surprising that Holocaust denial figures prominently in the activities for which Ernst Zundel, John Ross Taylor, Jim Keegstra, Donald Andrews and Robert Smith were brought before our country's courts and Malcolm Ross before a human rights tribunal.

The Holocaust stands as Western civilization's greatest failure. It was a natural outcome of centuries of racism and of anti- Semitism. To deny the Holocaust is to deny racism's capacity to undercut our civilization's basic values and to destroy democracy. Achieving our quest of a "new world order" depends on our learning the Holocaust's lessons.

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