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TO A WITCH, IT'S THAT OLD-TIME RELIGION;
[Broward Metro Edition]
Sun Sentinel - Fort Lauderdale
Author: MARY ROURKE Los Angeles Times
Date: Oct 13, 1998
Start Page: 1.E
Section: LIFESTYLE
Abstract (Document Summary)

A witch walks through the lobby of a hotel in Laguna Beach, Calif., and no one even notices. She looks too normal. Wiccan high priestess Phyllis Curott, a sleek blonde with a full set of teeth, has none of the storybook traits.

Her life story, though, is a bit off-center. Curott is a New York native, graduate of Brown University and New York University law school, civil liberties lawyer and president emeritus of the Covenant of the Goddess, an international association of practicing wiccans. That was before she switched to real estate law and added "author" to her credits. The Book of Shadows (Broadway Books, $25), about her 20 years as a witch, will be in stores later this month.

Things feel surprisingly normal until Curott explains how she and her husband, Bruce Fields, met. "It was in a dream," she says, and the whole picture starts to tilt. There he was, a dark-haired man dressed in a leather jacket, standing in her doorway, holding flowers. She woke up; a friend called and said he wanted to fix her up with a guy named Bruce.

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