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DICKIES MORE THAN FATHER FIGURES FOR NEW WAVE OF PUNK BANDS
[FIFTH Edition]
Morning Call - Allentown, Pa.
Author: FRANK PEARN JR. (A free-lance story for The Morning Call)
Date: Oct 21, 1994
Start Page: D.03
Section: WEEKEND MAGAZINE
Abstract (Document Summary)

The Dickies were one of the first of the late '70s punk bands to make any headway into mainstream culture. The band's first two albums, "The Incredible Shrinking Dickies" and "Dawn Of The Dickies," were released on a major label, A&M Records in 1979, almost 15 years before Green Day made the jump from an independent label to a major. The Dickies also were one of the first punk bands on MTV.

Marc Vachon is [Charlie Alexander]'s replacement, and if you are wondering how he's fitting in with [Leonard Graves Phillips], [Jonathan Melvoin] and guitarists Stan Lee and Glen Laughlin and if he's able to do justice to classic Dickies hits, Melvoin offers this reassurance: "He's doing remarkably well, out of pure necessity."

The Dickies ties with the current punk scene go deeper than just being father figures. Bobby Shayer, drummer for Bad Religion, is Melvoin's drum tech and stage manager when he's not busy with his own band. And on "Idjit Savant" the Dickies do a song co-written by Pat Smear (of Germs and, more recently, Nirvana fame) and Phillips. "Pat Smear wrote the song, and then Leonard added the bridge."

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