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THEATER; From bearing witness to writing drama; Playwrights taking on the genocides in Sudan and Rwanda look beyond moral appeals and horror to connect.
[HOME EDITION]
Los Angeles Times - Los Angeles, Calif.
Subjects: Dramatists; Theater; Genocide
Author: Pincus-Roth, Zachary
Date: Jul 22, 2007
Start Page: F.5
Section: Sunday Calendar; Part F; Calendar Desk
Abstract (Document Summary)

Like "The Overwhelming," many of these plays have a Western character who leads the audience into an unfamiliar world -- a journalist in "In Darfur"; an investigator in "Rash"; a writing tutor in "I Have Before Me."

At a talkback for "The Overwhelming" in London, [Rogers] was asked if political plays could make a difference. "I really don't think so," he responded. Then, he recalls, "somebody, with perfect timing, put up their hand and said, 'I just saw your play last week, I just joined Human Rights Watch, and I'm going to Rwanda for two months. The whole audience stood up [and applauded]. And I was like, 'Well, I'm proved wrong.' "

HAUNTED HOUSE: John Daggett and Laura Flanagan perform [Catherine Filloux]'s "[Raphael Lemkin]'s House" in New York. Daggett plays the ghost of Raphael Lemkin, who coined the term "genocide."; PHOTOGRAPHER: Sue Rees; DARFUR DRAMA: Rutina Wesley gives a reading of Winter Miller's "In Darfur" at New York's Public Theater.; PHOTOGRAPHER: Kate Raudenbush

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