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Waking from a sound sleep; Raw images of Katrina's devastation blew away TV's business-as-usual gloss and showed us what is really happening in the U.S.
[HOME EDITION]
Los Angeles Times - Los Angeles, Calif.
Subjects: Storm damage; Evacuations & rescues; News media; Hurricanes; Media coverage
Author: Gallagher, Nora
Date: Sep 9, 2005
Start Page: B.11
Section: California Metro; Part B; Editorial Pages Desk
Abstract (Document Summary)

In the midst of it, a woman who was looking for her son was interviewed at the Superdome. She was African American and had a face that had seen hell. She spoke slowly, almost unintelligibly. She kept saying, "My baby, my baby." Both her dignity and her raw, poor desperation finally brought the upbeat anchor to her knees.

[Katrina] blew that away. We got the story of what is really happening in the United States right between the eyes. We got the story of how poor people live and are treated in this country by watching them suffer and die. We got the story because it happened so fast, and right in front of our faces, and no one could put a spin on it quickly enough. We got the story because television reporters were openly outraged on camera. We got the story because reporters asked real questions and demanded real answers, rather than throwing softballs and settling for the fluff and the spin that pass for news. It was raw, it was awful, and it slid under the skin of our sleepy, numb, feel-good lives.

In the midst of it, a woman who was looking for her son was interviewed at the Superdome. She was African American and had a face that had seen hell. She spoke slowly, almost unintelligibly. She kept saying, "My baby, my baby." Both her dignity and her raw, poor desperation finally brought the upbeat anchor to her knees.

[Katrina] blew that away. We got the story of what is really happening in the United States right between the eyes. We got the story of how poor people live and are treated in this country by watching them suffer and die. We got the story because it happened so fast, and right in front of our faces, and no one could put a spin on it quickly enough. We got the story because television reporters were openly outraged on camera. We got the story because reporters asked real questions and demanded real answers, rather than throwing softballs and settling for the fluff and the spin that pass for news. It was raw, it was awful, and it slid under the skin of our sleepy, numb, feel-good lives.

Buy Complete Document: AbstractAbstract Full Text Full Text

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