ARCHIVES Search | Login | Search Tips | FAQ | Pricing | About the Archive | Terms
ProQuest is no longer the archive provider for Los Angeles Times. Please visit their web site to view their new archive. If you have previously purchased articles, you may log in to view them. If you have an active article plan, you may log in and continue to use it.
Document
Search
Saved
Saved
Help
Start a New Search
Buy Complete Document: AbstractAbstract Full Text Full Text
The World; Indignation Grows in U.S. Over British Prewar Documents; Critics of Bush call them proof that he and Blair never saw diplomacy as an option with Hussein.
[HOME EDITION]
Los Angeles Times - Los Angeles, Calif.
Subjects: Archives & records; Iraq War-2003; Foreign policy -- United States--US
Author: Daniszewski, John
Date: May 12, 2005
Start Page: A.3
Section: Main News; Part A; Foreign Desk
Abstract (Document Summary)

The documents, obtained by Michael Smith, a defense specialist writing for the Sunday Times of London, include a memo of the minutes of a meeting July 23, 2002, between [Tony Blair] and his intelligence and military chiefs; a briefing paper for that meeting and a Foreign Office legal opinion prepared before an April 2002 summit between Blair and [Bush] in Texas.

The leaked minutes sum up the July 23 meeting, at which Blair, top security advisors and his attorney general discussed Britain's role in Washington's plan to oust [Saddam Hussein]. The minutes, written by Matthew Rycroft, a foreign policy aide, indicate general thoughts among the participants about how to create a political and legal basis for war. The case for military action at the time was "thin," Foreign Minister Jack Straw was characterized as saying, and Hussein's government posed little threat.

In January 2002, Bush described Iraq as a member of an "axis of evil," but the sustained White House push for Iraqi compliance with U.N. resolutions did not come until September of that year. That month, Bush addressed the U.N. General Assembly to outline a case against Hussein's government, and he sought a bipartisan congressional resolution authorizing the possible use of force.

Buy Complete Document: AbstractAbstract Full Text Full Text

Most Viewed Articles  (Updated Daily)