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A FAMILY CONFRONTS ITS HISTORY ; DESCENDANTS OF SLAVERS DIG INTO LEGACY OF SHAME
[5 NORTHWEST CONNECTICUT/SPORTS FINAL Edition]
Hartford Courant - Hartford, Conn.
Author: FRANCES GRANDY TAYLOR||||||Courant Staff Writer
Date: Jul 5, 2006
Start Page: A.1
Section: MAIN (A)
Abstract (Document Summary)

From 1769, several generations of the DeWolf clan owned more than 40 slave ships that sailed from Bristol to West Africa to plantations in Cuba, where the slaves were sold at auction. Over the years ships owned by the DeWolfs brought an estimated 11,000 African slaves to the West. When the import of slaves became illegal in 1807, the DeWolfs smuggled slaves and their business continued to thrive.

[Ledlie Laughlin], [Katrina Browne] and eight other DeWolf descendants spent several weeks retracing the "Triangle Trade," starting in Bristol, traveling to the still-standing slave forts of Ghana and to the ruins of the family's old plantations in Cuba.

The family also became prominent in the Episcopal Church. Mark Antony DeWolf Howe headed the diocese in central Pennsylvania from 1871 until 1895. James DeWolf Perry, bishop of Rhode Island, was elected presiding bishop of the church in 1930. St. Michael's Church, built in Bristol in the 1800s, was generously supported as the DeWolf family church.

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