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NEWTON REPLANTS ITS HISTORY ; BIG HOPES FOR TINY ANGINO FARM, WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM ITS FRIENDS
[THIRD Edition]
Boston Globe - Boston, Mass.
Subjects: Community support; Public lands; Farms; Historic preservation
Author: Ranalli, Ralph
Date: Jun 29, 2006
Start Page: 1
Section: Globe West
Abstract (Document Summary)

Much of the 31,000 square feet of growing space has been planted with organic vegetables, including spinach, sugar snap peas, scallions, Chinese cabbages, spinach, lettuce, cucumbers, and Swiss chard. Later this season and in the future, the farm's crew plans to add Asian pears, blueberries, and even more exotic offerings such as lingonberries a Scandinavian fruit that "no one really eats unless they've been to Ikea," said manager Greg Maslowe and cloudberries.

One thing that will not be grown at the farm is corn, a crop too space-hungry for the small plot. Still, the Angino farmstand will kowtow to that vegetable's summer popularity by selling ears it buys wholesale from other local organic farms, Maslowe said.

Maslowe and [Jon Regosin], the Newton Community Farm president, say that bringing the farm back to life has given them a deep appreciation for the Angino family and the sheer ingenuity they used to live off such a small plot. Crescenzo Angino, who purchased the farm in 1917, was a caretaker for larger surrounding farms and estates, and used the manure from their horses to fertilize his own field.

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